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Idaho Law / Mandate
(N95, KN95, 3-PLY Surgical Masks, Cloth Masks)

For the most up to date information please check with the official state web site of Idaho.

Do I have to wear a mask? Wear face coverings while in public, especially when six-foot distancing is not always possible.

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STATE OF IDAHO

IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE

STAY HEALTHY GUIDELINES

June 13, 2020

BUSINESSES AND GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES MAY CONTINUE TO RESUME OPERATIONS AT PHYSICAL LOCATIONS IN THE STATE OF IDAHO.

ALL BUSINESSES AND GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES SHOULD ADHERE TO THE PHYSICAL DISTANCING AND SANITATION REQUIREMENTS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 4.

VULNERABLE INDIVIDUALS LIVING IN THE STATE OF IDAHO MAY RESUME PUBLIC INTERACTIONS BUT SHOULD TAKE PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES.

GATHERINGS OF ANY SIZE ARE ALLOWED BUT SHOULD ADHERE TO THE PHYSICAL DISTANCING AND SANITATION REQUIREMENTS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 4.

NON-ESSENTIAL TRAVEL CAN RESUME.

THE GOVERNOR AND IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE DIRECTOR FIND THAT:

1 – The virus that causes Coronavirus 2019 Disease (“COVID-19”) has resulted in a global pandemic, is present in Idaho, and has infected over 3,200 Idahoans, resulting in 85 deaths to date. The virus is easily transmitted, especially in group settings, and it is essential that the spread of the virus be slowed to protect public health and safety and safeguard the ability of public and private healthcare providers to handle an influx of new patients.

The Governor’s Guidelines for Opening Up Idaho are based on evidence of a reduction of severe cases of COVID-19 within the State of Idaho; as well as, the advice and input of state epidemiologists, public health experts, and guidelines provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) and the White House. These guidelines are also based on the scientific evidence and best practices regarding the most effective approaches to slow the transmission of communicable diseases generally and COVID-19 specifically, and evidence that the age, condition, and health of a significant portion of the population of the state places its citizens at risk for serious health complications, including death, from COVID-19.

Due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus, which the CDC considers a serious public health threat, there is a public health emergency throughout the State of Idaho. Making the problem worse, some individuals who contract the COVID-19 virus have no symptoms or have mild symptoms, which means they may not be aware they carry the virus. Because even people without symptoms can transmit the disease, and because evidence shows the disease is easily spread, gatherings can result in transmission of the virus.

At present, travel is a commonly known source of COVID-19 infections in Idaho. All fifty states and the District of Columbia have reported cases and declared states of emergency. Now, COVID-19 clusters with substantial community spread have developed across the United States, including in Idaho and neighboring states. One Idaho county had the highest per-capita number of cases in the country at one time and COVID-19 is believed to have been introduced into the county by a traveler or travelers visiting Idaho from out of state.

The scientific evidence shows that at this stage of the emergency, it is essential to slow virus transmission as much as possible to protect the most vulnerable and to prevent the healthcare system from being overwhelmed. Following State and CDC guidelines helps preserve critical and limited healthcare capacity in the State of Idaho. Opening certain business activities in stages reduces the risk of spread of COVID-19 to Idaho citizens, including Idaho’s most vulnerable population. In consultation with state and federal epidemiologists and healthcare experts, this staged approach is intended to preserve capacity in our healthcare system by opening businesses in stages and maintaining physical distancing.

2 – Vulnerable individuals in Idaho may resume public interactions but should practice physical distancing and wear face coverings or masks while in public. Vulnerable individuals should minimize exposure to social settings where distancing may not be practical. Vulnerable individuals that do not feel comfortable resuming public interactions are strongly encouraged to stay at home. Members of households with vulnerable residents should be aware that by returning to work or other environments where distancing is not always possible they could carry the virus back home.

Vulnerable individuals are people who are at higher risk for severe illness as defined by the CDC located at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-at-higher-risk.html

3 – People participating in gatherings of any size should adhere to the Physical Distancing and Sanitation recommendations in Section

4 – “Physical Distancing and Sanitation Recommendations”

Individuals should:

  • Maintain at least six-foot physical distancing from other individuals whenever possible;
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least twenty seconds as frequently as possible or use hand sanitizer;
  • Cover coughs or sneezes (into the sleeve or elbow, not hands);
  • Regularly clean high-touch surfaces and not shake hands;
  • Stay home if sick;
  • Wear face coverings while in public, especially when six-foot distancing is not always possible (e.g., inside businesses); and
  • Implement additional protocols established in the Governor’s Guidelines for Opening up Idaho published at https://rebound.idaho.gov/.

Employers should:

  • Develop and implement measures to ensure employees and customers maintain at least six-foot physical distancing from other individuals whenever possible;
  • Provide adequate sanitation and personal hygiene for employees, vendors, and patrons;
  • Frequently disinfect commonly touched and high-traffic areas and regularly clean those areas; Identify how personal use items such as masks, face coverings, and gloves may be required by employees, vendors, and/or patrons;
  • Provide services while limiting close interactions with patrons;
  • Identify strategies for addressing ill employees, which should include requiring COVID-19 positive employees to stay at home while infectious, and may include keeping employees who were directly exposed to the COVID-19 positive employee away from the workplace, and the closure of the business until the location can be properly disinfected;
  • On a case-by-case basis, include other practices appropriate for specific types of businesses such as screening of employees for illness and exposures upon work entry, requiring non-cash transactions, etc.; and
  • Implement additional protocols established in the Governor’s Guidelines for Opening up Idaho and the business-specific protocols published at https://rebound.idaho.gov/.
The Stay Healthy Order effective May 30, 2020 is hereby rescinded.